Deupree’s Historic Homes: Monmouth

Today’s post is a reprint from Mrs. N.D. Deupree’s “Some Historic Homes of Mississippi,” from Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society, Vol. VI (1902).

Photo courtesy MDAH Historic Preservation Division, scanned slide, 1972

Photo courtesy MDAH Historic Preservation Division, scanned slide, 1972

Monmouth

Monmouth, the home of General John A. Quitman, is now owned by his daughter, Mrs. Rosalie Quitman Duncan.  It was built in 1818 by a Mr. Harkinson, of New Jersey, and named “Monmouth” in memory of his native county.  In those days, yellow fever frequently swept away whole families in a few days.  Such was the, fate of the Harkinson family.  In 1825, Mr. Quitman, then a young man, bought Monmouth and made large additions to the original building, which is of that severe and simple style of architecture that produces a massive effect.  The heavy columns in front extend to the roof and the thick walls and the slate-floored portico give dignity to this grand old home.

It stands on a sloping hill and is approached by a semi-circular drive-way through a beautiful lawn, shaded by magnificent trees, adorned with rare shrubbery and lovely flowers.  The rose garden at Monmouth is a sight to delight the poet and painter’s eye, when in early spring the queen of flowers bursts into bloom.  In the great hall of the home are hung the family portraits; two of Gen. Quitman, one representing him in the flush of young manhood;  the other in the uniform of a major-general of the United States army, painted just after the Mexican war when the crown of laurel was fresh upon the brow of the hero of Belen Gate. Three of the old soldier’s swords hang under the portraits.  Near by stands a tall clock of the style known as “Grandfather clock.”  A recent visitor noticed the clock, and spoke of it by that name.  A granddaughter of Gen. Quitman answered, “Yes, that is ‘Grandfather’s clock’ and has been in the family one hundred years and still keeps time.”  In the well-filled library may be seen Gen. Quitman’s secretary with desk and chair;  over the secretary hangs a picture of John C. Calhoun; on the opposite wall hangs a painting of the battle of Chapultepec.

To this lovely home Mr. Quitman brought his wife and infant child soon after he bought it; here in later years he sought and found rest and recreation from the labors of public life.  Many honored sons of the United States have been guests in the home.  The Cuban patriot, Lopez, and the Cuban exile, J. S. Thrasher, were entertained in this hospitable home.  When Gen. Quitman returned from Mexico he was welcomed by a grand military display on the lawn in front of the house.

During the late war Monmouth was used as brigade headquarters by the Federal troops.  The family occupied rooms in the upper part of the house and beheld with aching hearts but helpless hands the destruction of the beautiful hedges, statuary, and many of the grand old trees that adorned the yards and lawn.  Other trees have been planted in the place of those destroyed and the genial clime of this sunny land has caused such a rapid growth that the old home is as beautiful now as it was when happy children played beneath the shade of the old trees.

 Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society, Vol. VI (1902), pp. 254-255.

You can stay at Monmouth if you’re in Natchez and tour it for yourself! Go to their website: http://monmouthplantation.com/

Photo by Jennifer Baughn, MDAH, "Natchez Study Tour (2009)." Accessed at Historic Resources Database, April 10, 2013.

Photo by Jennifer Baughn, MDAH, “Natchez Study Tour (2009).” Accessed at Historic Resources Database, April 10, 2013.

This post is part of a series taken from Mrs. N.D. Deupree’s “Some Historic Homes of Mississippi,” published in 1903. Want to read others in the series?

 



Categories: Architectural Research, Civil War, Cool Old Places, Natchez

1 reply

  1. Beautiful-always wanted to go to the Natchez Pilgrimage-now physically unable, so I very much enjoy these articles and pictures. Thank you.

    Like

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