Save America’s Treasures Grants

Save America’s Treasures grant program’s deadline for grant applications for this year is coming up in a few weeks, May 22, 2009. For those of you not familiar with SAT (as those in the biz call it, not to be confused with that nasty little test you have to take to get into college), it began under President Clinton in 1999. Here’s the blurb from the SAT website:

The Federal Save America’s Treasures program is one of the largest and most successful grant programs for the protection of our nation’s endangered and irreplaceable and endangered cultural heritage. Grants are available for preservation and/or conservation work on nationally significant intellectual and cultural artifacts and historic structures and sites. Intellectual and cultural artifacts include artifacts, collections, documents, sculpture, and works of art. Historic structures and sites include historic districts, sites, buildings, structures, and objects.

The grant is open to all units of government–federal, state, local–and non-profit organizations (including active religious organizations) and requires a one-to-one match (i.e, SAT puts in $100,000 and you put in $100,000, making a total of–say it all together–$200,000). You can find all the arcane details here. If you can’t put together an application this year, think ahead toward getting your numbers ready for next year–this is a very competitive program obviously, so you want to put your best foot forward when you send in your application.

The program has always been geared toward buildings and artifacts that had national significance (like the Constitution or the Liberty Bell or the Old Capitol), but lately, I think the definition of “national significance” has become a little more broad, so that places like our county courthouses (which are lovely of course, but possibly, just possibly–no hate mail please–aren’t nationally significant) have received grants. I’m not complaining, just pointing out something.

The SAT website has an easy-to-use search tool that shows us what Mississippi projects have been funded over the years–here are the results for your Monday morning edification:

Old Mississippi State Capitol Jackson Mississippi $525,000.00 2007
Ocean Springs Community Center Ocean Springs Mississippi $98,529.00 2006
Copiah County Courthouse Hazlehurst Mississippi $221,690.00 2006
Hinds County Courthouse Raymond Mississippi $221,690.00 2006
Monroe County Courthouse Aberdeen Mississippi $147,793.00 2006
WLBT News Film Collection, Mississippi Department of Archives and History Jackson Mississippi $227,000.00 2005
Lafayette County Courthouse Oxford Mississippi $197,221.00 2005
Clarke County Courthouse Quitman Mississippi $197,221.00 2005
Burns Church / Belfry House Oxford Mississippi $148,152.00 2004
Marks-Rothenberg Building Meridian Mississippi $197,535.00 2004
Pontotoc Courthouse Pontotoc Mississippi $296,303.00 2004
Beauvoir, Biloxi Biloxi Mississippi $300,000.00 2004
Stone County Courthouse Wiggins Mississippi $248,000.00 2003
L.Q.C. Lamar House Oxford Mississippi $390,000.00 2003
Eudora Welty House Jackson Mississippi $251,000.00 2003
George Ohr Museum and Cultural Center Biloxi Mississippi $425,000.00 2002
Mary O’Keefe Cultural Center Ocean Springs Mississippi $299,000.00 2001
Rowan Oak Oxford Mississippi $299,000.00 2001
Grand Opera House of Mississippi Meridian Mississippi $400,000.00 2000


Categories: Aberdeen, Biloxi, Grants, Hazlehurst, Historic Preservation, Jackson, Meridian, Ocean Springs, Oxford, Pontotoc, Quitman, Raymond, Renovation Projects, Wiggins

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