Remembering Hurricane Camille

ChurchRedeemer

Tower of the Church of the Redeemer, Biloxi, after Hurricane Camille

From the Biloxi Daily Herald, “Landmarks Lost During Camille,” by Emily Germanis, August 16, 1970:

“Historically speaking, the Mississippi Gulf Coast received a great blow as a result of Hurricane Camille. At least 15 well known landmarks were wiped out, others impaired.

. . . .After a survey of historical buildings on the Coast, those records destroyed include:

  • At Biloxi: the Wood home at Oak and East Beach [badly damaged, but later repaired]; Glennan home at Main and Central Beach; Magnolia Hotel [actually, it was badly damaged, but later moved and repaired]; Church of Redeemer; the lighthouse keeper’s home; the sho-fly; lighthouse on Baldwin Wood property and yacht club.
  • At D’Iberville: the Santa Cruz place.
  • At Gulfport: Merry Mansion
  • At Pass Christian: the Frank Wharton place; yacht club; St. Paul Catholic and Trinity Episcopal Church.
  • At Waveland: Pirate House

Those found partially destroyed and repairable include:

  • At Gautier: the Old Place.
  • At Delisle: Oblate Fathers home on the bay.
  • At Biloxi: Beauvoir Shrine; the Tullos home and Carquotte (Old Brick House on Bay).
  • At Pass Christian: Dixie White House; Ballymere; Xavier Hall (formerly Grey Castle); famed Japanese gardens of the Coopers; old Field Home, and Old Spanish Fort.
  • Also, Fort Massachusetts and outlaying islands”
Trinity Episcopal Church, Pass Christian, built 1849

Trinity Episcopal Church, Pass Christian, built 1849

TrinityCongregation1

Congregation of Trinity Episcopal Church, Pass Christian, after Camille destroyed the church building (in background)



Categories: Biloxi, Demolition/Abandonment, Disasters, Gulf Coast, Gulfport, Pass Christian

4 replies

  1. Reblogged this on Preservation in Mississippi and commented:

    This is a repost of the Miss Pres post remembering the 40th anniversary of Hurricane Camille

    Like

  2. camille surrounds some of the most iconic memories of my childhood. but perhaps the most devastating legacy of camille was how she fooled us into believing nothing could be worse, making many more susceptible to katrina’s endlessly reverberating shock and misery.

    Like

  3. Not familiar with Merry Mansion….more information, please!

    Like

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