“Glen Auburn,” Natchez

"Glen Auburn" by JuralMS (Flickr)

Glen Auburn, Natchez – (1875) Mississippi’s greatest remaining Second Empire structure. Due to the aftereffects of the Civil War, very few substantial Second Empire structures were constructed in Mississippi. Of the few that were constructed, Glen Auburn is possibly the only one that could be classified as a mansion. Many of the features originally constructed in 1875 for Christian Schwartz are still present, including the decorative ironwork around the roof, roof brackets, and stone quoins. Glen Auburn also occupies a central location on the edge of Natchez’s business district.

9 replies

  1. Very nice. I wish it had a little more color, but it is very pleasing to the eye, and I am not a big fan of Second Empire.

    It is not uncommon in Ohio, but not nearly as popular as Italianate. I have a few posted on my website at http://www.house-design-coffee.com/second-empire-house.html but none as impressive as this.

    Like

    • I do not know if this is the original paint color scheme for the house but I bet if any one knows the Historic Natchez Foundation would know.

      Thank you for sharing the link! The “one story” mansards are a favorite of mine for their uniqueness.

      Like

  2. The original color was a deep purple. The current owners painted it white because white is the easiest color to detect dirt which, in turn, is easier to keep clean. The inside has been upgraded in many ways including the fire places, the paint on the walls, the kitchen, and the master bathroom has been recently redone. The back yard has been completely upgraded and now has a back patio, a driveway, and a small yard for their grandchildren to play in. The house has three guest houses (used to be bed and breakfast quarters) in which two have been completely upgraded and redone. Their children often come home and stay in these guest houses. Their son actually lives in one with his family.

    Like

  3. What color is this home?

    Like

  4. Glen Auburn is now a very light beige almost white.

    Like

  5. The original color of Glen Auburn was white, and it was called “White House”. I am the current owner of Glen Auburn, and our goal was to do a restoration on the home. We have returned the original mantels, doors,hardware, and colors where we were able to find information.We also restored the original white picket fence. It was, indeed, a bed and breakfast for several years, but for the last fifteen years has been our family home.
    Ann Tillman

    Like

  6. It’s hard to communicate just how stunning this home is in person. My wife and I were just in Natchez and this house rooted her to the spot. It looks so flawless from the street it’s hard to imagine it was not just built.

    Like

  7. We stayed there many years ago and the paint colors were exquisite. A deep purple and grays We had a marvelous time. Everything was elegant. Even the towels and sheets were beautiful. I understand it was one of rhe many homes George Hamilton previously owned, hence the perpetual suntan from laying by the the pool, I do not know if the same owners have it to this day, however they were an absolutely lovely couple. It was the early 1990,s. The mansion was WELL taken care of. She was a teriffic cook. Marvelous weekend!!!
    Dr. and Mrs William Pusateri

    Like

    • Thank you, Mr. Pusateri…My husband and I have been the owners of Glen Auburn for the last 21 years, and it has been a wonderful place to raise our 6 children. We have, through the years, opened our house for special events and fundraisers for groups in town, but have never been on the regular tours. Carolyn and Richard Boyer were the owners when you were here. They moved to Franklin TN, and he is now deceased. The last word I had on Carolyn was that she is still in Franklin, and in her 80″s. And yes—she was a TERRIFIC cook!! We opted to restore the doors, mantels, hardware, etc, to the home when we bought it, and have returned it, as closely as possible, to its original condition.

      Ann Tillman

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: