Name This Place 12.2.4

Our last post for today.



Categories: Contest

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30 replies

  1. i will guess meridian– and, 2nd empire style— 1875-1895— but, have never seen this image–what a sad loss–

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  2. wonderful brackets, lintels, and the odd parapet about the tower is yes, odd— course, it could be vicksburg, too–but, am trying to think of the places in ms that had some money after the civil war, and meridian and vicksburg were, i think, the ‘growing-est’ places in ms because of the railroad connections—

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  3. 501 Cruise St., Corinth

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  4. Ahhhhhh . . . I get one! The Rubel Department Store in Corinth. Demolished c 1960.

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    • Well darn, I knew I’d seen it in that postcard from the building collapse. Even though the card was cropped for the article I didn’t realize we were looking at the smaller, much less interesting building beyond.

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      • This photo, I believe, is not cropped (or at least I did not crop it). There are lots of images of Rubel’s, but they tend to include the surrounding downtown, which would have been a dead give away because Corinth’s downtown is still pretty intact.

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    • Good job! Two points. For a little while there I thought I might have stumped everyone on day two of the contest.

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  5. http://clio.lib.olemiss.edu/cdm/singleitem/collection/rayburn/id/445/rec/7
    Common Name: Abe Rubel & Company Department Store
    City: Corinth County: Alcorn
    Construction Date: 1873-74 Date Destroyed: demolished in 1961
    Style(s): Italianate
    Stories: 3
    Details about Construction, Alterations, and Architect Builders

    Original building
    Year Role Documentation Name
    Architect–Joint Venture Documented Sekel, Lepold
    Architect–Joint Venture Documented Rubel, Emanuel

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  6. Whew! I was starting to worry W. was going to get four points out of this one–I didn’t know it either!

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    • After half an hour of no comments, I was beginning to wonder. But I had another errand to run and could not be here live for the answer.

      It makes me wonder whether I might get four points at least once over the next three days.

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    • MissPresers are too knowledgeable to stump for too long! At any rate, I’m betting aganst you.

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      • I will take that bet. Like I said at the beginning, I did not pick random, obscure buildings; that would be unfair, but I still believe that at least two posts have the strong potential to stump everyone.

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  7. So close, Carunzel, but good eye! My visual memory is only good for buildings I’ve physically been to see, not so much for pictures I’ve seen.

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  8. okay— corinth! wow. well, if i recall, there wasn’t too much left in corinth after the civil war, so, yes, new buildings were needed! am, must admit also that i don’t know all(ha!) of the buildings in n ms even though some of my family lived across the line in tn—

    and, yes, will concede to ‘italianate’ rather than ‘2nd empire’, though the mini-third floor has the feeling of a tower—think ‘glen auburn’ in natchez—-

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  9. The vintage automobile parked in front pf the building helps date the time the photo was taken.

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  10. well, as long as i get points for my other comments today, i will be happy to forgo any from this one—

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  11. Here is a link for more information about Rubel’s Department Store in Corinth, MS, written in 1997 by Stephanie L. Sandy.

    http://mlsandy.home.tsixroads.com/Corinth_MLSANDY/rubel.html

    “Emanuel Rubel (1837 – ca. 1907) and Leopold Sekeles (1830 – 1912) built the handsome four-story Rubel’s Department Store building on the corner lot of Fillmore and Cruise Streets, in 1873 – 1874. According to Goodspeed’s Biographical History, Emanuel Rubel supervised the building, “He made his own brick, arranged everything, and the building…with a seventy-five foot front, cost over $40,000…..” Martin Seigrist is credited by oral tradition as the architect and significant collaborator in the construction of the building. Martin Seigrist’s (1825 – 1897) best known works include the Curlee House, the Corinth Machinery Building, Tishomingo Hotel (burned by the Confederates leaving town in 1865), and the old Corona Female College (destroyed by the Federals as they evacuated Corinth in January 1864).”

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  12. glad to get the further info on corinth– i know the curlee house, the tishomingo hotel, and the corona female college but didn’t know the name of the supposed architect for all of these structures–always happy to learn anything about ms buildings and, gang, are we ready for tomorrow’s challenges?

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    • Martin Siegrist has a lot of buildings in Corinth attributed to him, but little “proof” of his involvement with them as far as documentation. The MDAH HRI only lists two buildings for him, but over a dozen more are considered his design. There are no drawings or papers related to his buildings that I am aware of though some could always be packed away somewhere. He was a builder/architect as well, so who knows how many of his designs were in his head, not on paper. Siegrist’s buildings are identified and attributed by oral history and some design features.

      Park Ranger Tom Parson wrote a piece on Siegrist in the May 5, 2013 Daily Corinthian. That should pique your interest in him, Ed. https://issuu.com/dailycorinthian/docs/daily_corinthian_e-editioni_050513/15

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  13. went back and looked up corona college since i recalled some archival photos i had seen years ago. found
    them on the net,(happily) along with a civil war sketch that was new to me. .certainly, this large greek revival building was one of the grandest of the style to be built in ms at any time pre-1860, although when it was constucted(late 1850s, completed 1858) it was terribly out of fashion for the east coast–resembling buildings there from the 1830s and 40s. it certainly doesn’t have any kind of european look even though mr segrist wasn’t american— so, one presumes that the building committee wanted a structure that was impressive but stylistically conservative! it is sad that this structure was taken over by the union forces in 1862 and burned when they left corinth in 1864—-‘war is hell’, huh? and, i also found some images of the rubel house, which is quirky colonial reivival; segrist?

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    • The Rubel House has occasionally been attributed to Siegrist, ignoring the fact that he had been dead for several years.

      If you really want to learn about early Corinth architecture, you should probably read Todd Sanders’s Master’s Thesis M. A. Miller’s Sketchbook of 1860 Corinth: The Built Environment of a Mississippi Boomtown, found at this link: http://mlsandy.home.tsixroads.com/Corinth_MLSANDY/todd.html. There is also Cross City Chronicle: A Pictorial History of Architecture in Corinth and Alcorn County by Rosemary Taylor Williams, one of a smattering of architectural publications coinciding with the Bicentennial (of America, unless I am mistaken, no architectural history books were published to commemorate Mississippi’s bicentennial).

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  14. why am i still awake? it’s 12.25 am up here–and, yes, still cold outside, with more snow predicted for tomorrow— shall i ‘stay in and play’ on misspreservation.com or do something constructive? mr white, of course, thanks for above info on corinth; i know todd’s fine master’s thesis— don’t know about the williams book–and, yes, why isn’t there a book on ms arch to celebrate the bicentennial? malvaney, think you might know something about the ‘buildings of ms’/sah book? a publication date, perhaps?

    okay, am wondering when we are going to have a religious structure in the quiz? or, performing arts? or eatery? when i first looked at the rubel bldg, i thought that it might be one of those combo structures— commmerical, maybe residential, auditorium and meeting room????

    and, finally, don’t think corinth has a monopoly on buildings designed by deceased architects—-i know i have come across them in my research, but, at this late/early hour, can’t think of any—

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