Mississippi Streets: 1960s Meridian

MERIDIAN, MISSISSIPPI . . . 21st Avenue, showing the Three Foot Building in the background and world-famous Weidmann's Restaurant in right foreground.

MERIDIAN, MISSISSIPPI . . . 21st Avenue, showing the Three Foot Building in the background and world-famous Weidmann’s Restaurant in right foreground.

Note: I’m not an expert in dating postcards, so this date is just my best guess. If you have something better, let us know in the comments.

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Categories: Meridian

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12 replies

  1. Weidmann’s was world-famous but not famous enough that someone would stop the philistines from ripping its face off and turning it into a fern bar.

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  2. If I’m not mistaken, that’s a white Thunderbird parked in front of the drug store. If it is, it would be a 1964 Thunderbird hard top because of the tail lights. In 1963, they still had round tail lights and in 1965, they introduced the sequential tail lights. These look light the 1964 tail lights, which were a transition style between the two.

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  3. HORRORS!!!! Glad you posted this “new” Weidmann’s! I can pitch my own private hissy fit at home. New look is pitiful compared to the original façade.

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    • Poor Weidmann’s. I should have noted in the post above that there are two Chris Risher, Sr. designs in the 1960s streetview: Weidmann’s and the 4-story Art Moderne Vise Clinic in the background. Risher reportedly was friends with the Weidmanns and created this Bavarian-themed facade at their request in the 1950s. Alas, it was a victim of new owners who I believe were well-meaning in their attempt to “return” the building to its original look. One of many reasons I don’t agree with the “Scraper” point of view (for more on this, see https://misspreservation.com/2009/05/21/how-buildings-learn-preservation-part-2/.

      I don’t know why, but whenever I’m upset with the Scrapers, I can’t remember the word “Scraper” and call them “Strippers” which is technically accurate, but perhaps not appropriate in polite company.

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  4. I’m not a car expert, but the white 4-door sedan looks like the Ford Fairlane (1963) that my grandparents owned. Definitely think this was early-mid ’60’s. And who ever ruined Weidmann’s should be ashamed. It is a nice looking building now, but …..

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  5. This is a fascinating conversation. Even here, amongst folks who read the PRESERVATION IN MISSISSIPPI blog, there seems to be more interest in (and knowledge of) vintage cars than vintage buildings, and a greater sense of loss when looking at photos of lost automobiles than lost architecture. Both losses are painful, and both, I suppose can be chalked up to a shallow search for the new and the mindless neglect of history, and of our collective memory. But especially when important buildings are demolished by simpletons with no sense of the importance of either, a living culture is always the biggest loser.

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