National Register 2016: Individual Listings

It’s a MissPres tradition to take the last week or so of the year and present lists of important preservation milestones that have occurred during the year. We’ll kick this week off with Part 1 of the National Register listings for 2016, helpfully provided for us once again by Bill Gatlin, National Register Coordinator with the Mississippi Dept. of Archives and History. We had fourteen new listings, 8 individual properties and 6 historic districts. The list of individual properties is in order by the date they were formally accepted to the National Register by the National Park Service.

For historic districts listed in 2016, see next post.

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Brewer House
Crystal Springs vicinity, Copiah County

brewer-house-copiahThe Brewer House is eligible for listing on the National Register of Historic Places as a local example of a rural vernacular Greek Revival raised planter’s cottage with accompanying outbuildings. Construction began by F.M. Brewer a few years after the end of the Civil War. The assemblage of farm-related outbuildings exemplifies the continued and adaptive agriculture practices of the farm. Vegetable farming provided income for much of the farm’s history, while subsistence farming and cattle raising kept the farm working in later years. The extant barns potato house, silo, and chicken coop most likely served the everyday needs of the farm, providing fresh and cured meats supplemented by vegetables and fruits grown in garden patches.
Tricia Nelson, preservation consultant, wrote the nomination. The Brewer House was listed on January 19, 2016.

The nomination can be viewed here: http://www.apps.mdah.ms.gov/nom/prop/2145889142.pdf

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Georgetown Methodist Church
Georgetown, Copiah County

georgetown-methodist-copiahThe Georgetown Methodist Church is a good local example of a popular vernacular church form. Built in 1934 and dedicated in 1936, it is the only vernacular wood, gable-front church in Georgetown. The interior and exterior maintain a high degree of integrity. The original wood siding and wood doors are extant along with 15 original wood 6/6 double-hung windows and four 4/4 wood double- hung windows. The 6/6 windows contain original decorative glass panes. The interior has original bead board walls and wainscoting along with original lights, pews, and heart pine flooring throughout. No heating or air conditioning has been installed. Tricia Nelson, preservation consultant, wrote the nomination. The Georgetown Methodist Church was listed on January 19, 2016.

The nomination can be viewed at: http://www.apps.mdah.ms.gov/nom/prop/5640.pdf

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House at 5098 Highway 604
Pearlington, Hancock County

pearlington-houseThe House at 5098 Highway 604 is a local example of a rural vernacular Greek Revival planter’s cottage. Built around 1880, the house is one of the only surviving historic residences in Pearlington from this time period. Most other historic residences in the small community have disappeared due to demolition or disaster. This house was damaged by the Hurricane Katrina storm surge and most of the structural damage occurred when the building’ was lifted off its masonry piers and dropped to the ground causing severe wracking. Although the house had to have a new foundation and new windows, the rehabilitation has been sensitive to the historic character of the building. Tricia Nelson, preservation consultant, wrote the nomination. The House at 5098 Highway 604 was listed on January 19, 2016.

The nomination can be viewed at: http://www.apps.mdah.ms.gov/nom/prop/101736.pdf

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Durant Illinois Central RR Depot
Durant, Holmes County

durant-depotThe Durant Illinois Central Depot, built in 1909, operated as a primary force in the commercial and cultural activities of Holmes County and the surrounding region. The depot served passenger trains that carried Durant’s citizens beyond the community and brought visitors from outside. It established Durant as a center of commerce with freight trains carrying produce from local farms and industries to far points on the ICRR railroad network and connections with other lines. The Illinois Central Railroad encouraged new businesses and industries in Durant, such as timber and dairy production, and helped local owners to find customers across the state and nation. Before the creation of the Interstate Highway System, passenger trains provided affordable accommodations for the traveling public and facilitated a wide variety of cultural events such as church meetings, business conventions, family reunions, and traveling theater shows. Sharron Daniel Cauthen, Chairman of the Durant Historic Preservation Commission, wrote the nomination. The Durant Depot was listed on January 19, 2016.

The nomination can be viewed at: http://www.apps.mdah.ms.gov/nom/prop/14326.pdf

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(old) Port Gibson High School
Port Gibson, Claiborne County

port-gibson-high-schoolBeginning with its construction in 1924, the (old) Port Gibson High School has provided an education to multiple generations of Port Gibson residents and remains a school up to the present. The intact campus provides a good example of the way education needs grew and changed during the twentieth century in a small Mississippi city. Seven structures compose the campus, which served as the elementary and high school for all white students in Port Gibson. They generally face east at the end of the circular drive, except for the band hall, which is separated from the rest of the buildings and is located on the south side of the drive facing north. All buildings are substantial brick structures, except for a few temporary structures on the back part of the campus. Three buildings—the original administration building (1924), the elementary building (1939) and the elementary school annex (1958) are joined together with hyphens that allow internal passage between them along one continuous hallway. Jennifer Baughn, MDAH Chief Architectural Historian, and Bill Gatlin, MDAH architectural historian, wrote the nomination. The old Port Gibson High School was listed May 17, 2016.

The nomination can be viewed here: http://www.apps.mdah.ms.gov/nom/prop/3985.pdf

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Perkins House
DeKalb vicinity, Kemper County

perkins-house-kemperThe Perkins House is significant as an intact and relatively rare example of a mid-nineteenth century middle class farmhouse in Kemper County similar to but smaller than the typical I-house found in the region. As such, it illustrates the diversity of form displayed by the region’s domestic buildings of this period. Stylistic evidence suggests it was constructed c. 1870. It is also particularly significant for the well-preserved, late nineteenth century, ornamental painting which it contains. Oral tradition dates the painting to c. 1890. The house was listed in its original location in June 1994. It was moved to its current location in 2012, automatically de-listing it from the National Register, but the setting is similar to its original location in the same county, so it is considered to retain its integrity. Dr. Michael Fazio, architectural preservation consultant wrote the nomination. The Perkins House was re-listed on May 17, 2016.

The nomination can be viewed here: http://www.apps.mdah.ms.gov/nom/prop/2145894601.pdf

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Arbuthnot Grocery and House
Woodville vicinity, Wilkinson County

arbuthnot-grocery-wilkinsonThe Arbuthnot Grocery and House is an example of a rural grocery store owned and operated by African Americans. The store was a social gathering and meeting place for the African American community in the Pinckneyville community in the 1950s and 1960s. The Arbuthnot Grocery and House are significant for association with Estelle Arbuthnot, an entrepreneur and social leader in her community. The Arbuthnot Grocery and House are simple vernacular buildings. But they are intimately tied into the African American experience in Wilkinson County, especially the important place of property-owning African Americans who became leaders in the civil rights movement. The store that Estelle and Willie Arbuthnot built was not only a business, but the social and political hub of a community. Billie Faye Harris, Great granddaughter and Jacqueline Arbuthnot, Granddaughter of Willie and Estelle Arbuthnot, wrote the nomination. The Arbuthnot Grocery and Store was listed on May 20, 2016.

The nomination can be viewed here: http://www.apps.mdah.ms.gov/nom/prop/2145890038.pdf

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The Hermitage
Picayune, Pearl River County

hermitage-picayuneThe Hermitage is a 12-acre estate on the banks of the Hobolochitto Creek in Picayune, Pearl River County, Mississippi. Once part of a much larger property, the house is set at the end of a long narrow driveway entered through a pair of monumental gates. The main house is set on a bluff above the creek with a large lawn separating the two. The house achieved its current configuration in three phases. The oldest portion of the house was built by Leonard Kimball in 1858. The hipped roof block has a partial wrap-around undercut gallery and was probably triple-pile with a center hall. In 1917, Lamont Rowlands, a partner in the Goodyear Yellow Pine Company, acquired the house and added two wings to create a U-shape and informal courtyard on the east elevation that included octagonal rooms at the junction with the existing house and the addition. Robert H. Crosby, the son of Rowlands’s partner in the Goodyear Yellow Pine Company, acquired the house in 1937 and completed a major renovation. Crosby completed a second renovation in 1952, employing New Orleans architects Koch & Wilson. The current floor plan and finishes date to the Crosby era of occupation. Crosby enclosed some porches on the north and south elevations of the 1858 block, altered the formal rooms of the of the 1858 wing and installed well-crafted high-quality finishes throughout the house including marble mantels, parquet and inlaid wood floors, decorative molding and cabinetry with carved details. Crosby installed a swimming pool and expanded the formal landscape design. The Hermitage was listed on September 7, 2016. The nomination was written by Mrs. Lynn Burger, the owner.

The nomination may be viewed here: http://www.apps.mdah.ms.gov/nom/prop/24952.pdf

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See National Register lists from years past by clicking here and compare this list to the Map of Mississippi National Register Listings.



Categories: African American History, Cool Old Places, Durant, Historic Preservation, National Register, Picayune, Port Gibson, Schools, Vernacular Architecture

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5 replies

  1. The Georgetown Methodist Church congregation has been working on getting the church nominated to the National Register since 2010. I reported on it when I used to do regular News Roundups: MissPres News Roundup 8-30-2010. Back then, I said it was a slam dunk that it would get listed. I guess I was a little off (slam dunks usually do not take six years).

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  2. I find it very strange that we do not know who owned the Pearlington House; though it greatly resembles the Boardman Russ House which was once located at 6113 Highway 604.

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  3. Congratulations to Lynn Burger for successfully having the Hermitage listed. As far as I know, it is the first building to be listed on the National Registry in Pearl River County and only the second registry listing, after the Tiger Hammock archeological site.

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  4. Thank you for sharing these. I’m looking forward to reading through each nomination – perhaps on New Years Day! Each location is very deserving of the nomination!

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  5. This is going to take a while, but the Brewer house was a good first read. One down…

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