N. W. Overstreet, 1928

If you missed it, or if last week’s History Is Lunch series presentation by Michael Fazio has you hankering for more  N.W. Overstreet, below is a brief biography of Mississippi’s homegrown architect from a 1928 publication with the long winded title From Mississippi Today : the state of opportunity and resources, a comprehensive book of true facts with editorial mentions of men and women who have proven themselves “Builders” of Mississippi and its Institutions… [edited and compiled by Munro Nichols.]

Noah Webster Overstreet was the first registered architect in Mississippi, designing buildings across the state and in Louisiana and Tennessee throughout his long career.  This biography was crafted twenty years after Overstreet graduated from Mississippi State, then known as Mississippi A&M.  The biography was accompanied by a small photograph of the then 40 year-old architect.

21871935595_6122e7c216_zN.W. Overstreet, Jackson, Miss. — Architect.— Many of the handsome buildings that grace the city of Jackson and many other cities in Mississippi and the surrounding States are in their beauty the product of the artistic thought of N.W. Overstreet, one of the leading architects of the South. For twenty years Mr. Overstreet has followed his profession, and if the drawing, design, and specifications are needed for a building that counts, he is called on to make them. For fifteen years he has been located in Jackson and has gained a high position as a progressive citizen as well as an architect. Mr. Overstreet is a native of Mississippi and a graduate of Mississippi A. & M. College, receiving his B.B. degree from that institution as a mechanical engineer. Afterward he graduated from the University of Illinois in architecture with a degree of B.S. It would not be out of place to say that Mr. Overstreet has designed more of the handsome buildings in the State than all other architects combined. He is a good Mississippian and is doing his share in the upbuilding of the State as well as his home city.



Categories: Architectural Research

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