New Deal in Mississippi: Teacherage in Hickory Flat

Teacherage

In a follow up from last week’s visit to the Hickory Flat cafeteria constructed by the National Youth Administration in 1939, we are still on campus.  A short walk from the cafeteria building, one teacherage of the two constructed by NYA remains extant and in use.  Also rock veneer, it was constructed in 1939.

damage to veneer

Damage to the corner of the veneer shows the underlying wood.  Last week a question was raised about the location of the quarry for the stone.  The only two documented quarries with connection to the New Deal projects that I have located so far are the ones in Tishomingo, near the state park, and the one at Rosalba Lake Rock Quarry in Pontotoc County, although W. White pointed out that there were probably a number of quarries for the amount of stone work represented in this period of construction.

The teacherage pictured directly above is no longer extant.  Its former location next to the old gymnasium and in front of the new gymnasium suggests it might have been demolished in order to construct the new gym.

unidentified building

Initially, I thought the rock veneer building above might have been a teacherage also, as it is located on the opposite end of the block containing the school complex.  No NYA stone was visible, and its design does not match the photo of the demolished building.  Information about the building is not in the MDAH database for Hickory Flat, so if anyone knows, please share in comments.



Categories: Historic Preservation, New Deal, Schools

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2 replies

  1. I wonder if this is not a community house. There are some that were stone-veneered, for example the Winona Community House http://www.apps.mdah.ms.gov/Public/prop.aspx?id=24011&view=facts&y=1010:.

    These were WPA funded, so fit into your New Deal in Mississippi travels

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  2. Those high, small windows on the side usually indicate shelving inside, which is usually a marker for a store of some kind, maybe with a residence in the back? I’ve seen private residences with this veneer from that period, so it was a building material for more than just New Deal projects.

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