Vacation Postcards: Wall Doxey State Park

MissPres is on vacation this week, but we’re sending postcards back from Mississippi’s past.

Lodge and Visitor's Center--Wall Doxey State Park. Located near Holly Springs, Wall Doxey is one of the original parks in the state system and features fishing, swimming, camping, vacation cabins, nature trails, and a lodge suitable for banquets, meetings, and dances. Wall Doxey State Park, Holly Springs, MS 38635. (601) 252-4231.

Lodge and Visitor’s Center–Wall Doxey State Park. Located near Holly Springs, Wall Doxey is one of the original parks in the state system and features fishing, swimming, camping, vacation cabins, nature trails, and a lodge suitable for banquets, meetings, and dances. Wall Doxey State Park, Holly Springs, MS 38635. (601) 252-4231.



Categories: Holly Springs

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6 replies

  1. Is this building still standing and well maintained? It is so pretty!

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  2. I just drove by yesterday, intending to stop for photos, but it was pouring rain at the moment.

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  3. :) YAY! Glad it’s still there and still pretty!

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  4. Chesley Smith, the authority on all things Marshall County, told me that the remains of Morro Castle went underwater when the lake was created at Wall Doxey. Does anyone know any details on that?

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  5. Is this the same structure?

    From the Marshall County page of the MSGenWeb Project — http://msgw.org/marshall/locales/historic.php

    Morro Castle Plantation (circa 1857) – Morro Castle was never completed and is now demolished. It was located 3 miles South of Holly Springs. The two rear one story wings were finished and lived in by William Blanton Lumpkin until his death in 1877. [Architectural drawing courtesy of the late Hugh H. Rather, Jr., drawn in 1979, from a sketch by Aunt Lula Jones Jarratt in 1928. The Hugh H. Rather, Jr. family holds the copyright on this drawing.] Additional historical information: Front (North) Elevation. The house would have looked similar to this if it had been completed. The War Between the States caused the work to stop suddenly. Only the brick walls of the front two story portion were built. The house stood on a hill and thus a person on the observation cupola would have been able to get a general view of much of the surrounding plantation land. The design of this mansion is similar to other homes that had been built in W. B. Lumpkin’s native Georgia.

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